Tag Archives: furniture design

PrintShelf

Print Block To Plant Shelf: Creating Simple Green Spaces

Print Block To Plant Shelf: Simple Green Spaces

By Daric Gill

PrintShelf
PrintShelf: 1969 Sewall Bros. Print Press Block & antique cast iron corner brace. 7” (tall) x 6 1/2” (wide) x 6 5/8” (deep)

As the cold chill of winter air begins to breathe down the neck of the midwest, it’s time to bring the plants indoors and bunker down for the season. This provides a wonderful opportunity to create new green spaces in the home. I intended to take full advantage of this quality opportunity. After buying a cache of antique hardware, I’ve found myself with plenty of materials from which to create new projects. The PrintShelf is a simple little shelf made from a 1969 Sewall Bros. print press block & antique cast iron corner brace. Perfect for those small moments of green joy inside.

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Refurbished, re-carved violin necks, curly maple. 13" x 14 1/4" x 10”

Furniture Made From Violin Necks Gets Photoshoot

Shelf Made From Violin Necks Gets New Images

by Daric Gill

Refurbished, re-carved violin necks, curly maple. 13" x 14 1/4" x 10”
Refurbished, re-carved violin necks, curly maple. 13″ x 14 1/4″ x 10”.

Many years ago, a luthier (stringed instrument maker) invited me to check out his studio. He let me look through his amazing wood selection and gave demonstrations on a few of his unique tools. After seeing how excited I was, he gave me a dozen or so badly damaged violins. In a box was a jumbled pile of discarded remnants; years of scraps due to constant middle school repairs. Since then, I’ve reworked some of the bits out of their sticky and marred surfaces and created a few pieces of one-off furniture.

One such journey was the Violin Neck Shelf, made a few years ago. Two violin necks hold up a thick piece of curly maple. Their fingerboards are bend at 90 degrees, hiding a recessed metal bracket. This piece was made opening week of a gallery exhibition and its quick turn-around left me with very few detailed images of the installed piece. Today I’m happy to announce that it has sold to a new owner, which allowed me the opportunity to retake some photos of the piece. Check out the gallery below.

New Images of Butterfly Singer Table

Sold Table Gets New Digs

"Butterfly Singer Sewing Table": Bloodwood inlayed into Birdseye Maple, polyester resin, 1901 Singer sewing machine treadle
“Butterfly Singer Sewing Table”: Bloodwood inlayed into Birdseye Maple, polyester resin, 1901 Singer sewing machine treadle

As I kick off the new year with updated images, I’ve been given special access to re-shoot a sold piece. This is a piece of furniture I made a few years ago and has gone into the home of a dear collector of my work. Among the first things you’ll notice is the bloodwood butterfly joints recessed into the birdseye maple top. Some call this joint a bowtie, double dovetail, or key joints. These two butterfly joints span a laminated seam and are additionally aided by internal biscuit joints along that seam.  All inlays were hand chiseled. The bloodwood keys are naturally that alizarin in color which is primarily where the name blood-wood comes. Coated with a thick layer of polyester resin, this whole top sits above a fully restored 1901 Singer sewing machine treadle with a rare maple wood spindle arm that helps drive the fly-wheel from the foot-pedal.

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High End Desk Made From 1800’s Antiques

From Victorian Era To Contemporary Furniture: The Making Of A New Antique Desk

by Daric Gill

DoorDeskFront4
“DoorDesk”, Reclaimed antique mahogany door, 1873 Singer Sewing machine base, double strength glass. 29 3/4″ tall x 36″ wide, 23″ deep. 1.7.15.

Among my favorite things in this world is finding new lives for really old materials. I’m fascinated by the challenge presented by the reclamation process and often find myself harvesting extremely old parts to use in yet undesigned projects. After restoring a Singer Sewing machine base on a previous piece of furniture (check it out here), I was fortunate enough to have a few more fall into my lap. My latest piece is made from restoring an 1873 Singer Sewing machine base and a chopped mahogany door that I believe is from a schoolhouse of that same era. Both pieces were in severe disrepair and needed considerable restoration before showing their past beauty.

Full Image Gallery Below

Continue reading High End Desk Made From 1800’s Antiques